HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
CIVIC CENTRE, MACMAHON STREET, HURSTVILLE.
__________________________________


SUMMARY OF ITEMS CONTAINED IN THE
DIVISIONAL MANAGER - POLICY PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENT' REPORT
TO THE MEETING OF THE DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND PLANNING COMMITTEE
TO BE HELD ON 96 11 06TH NOVEMBER, 1996-



07:01 Cooks River Catchment Management Committee
07:02 Development Control Plan - Child Care Centres
07:03 Councils And Residents Against The Selection On Holsworthy (Crash)
07:04 Planning Studies Update
07:04 Policy Planning And Environment Report

HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
REPORT ITEM NO: .
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT
DIVISIONAL MANAGER - POLICY PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENT
REPORT NO 01TO THE DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND PLANNING COMMITTEE
TO BE HELD ON 96 11 06TH NOVEMBER, 1996-


The General Manager
Hustville City Council
The Civic Centre
HURSTVILLE

Dear Sir,

Hereunder is my report No.01 to be submitted to the DEVELOPMENT, HEALTH AND PLANNING Committee:-


07.01 COOKS RIVER CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE


Councillor John Griffin has submitted the following report of the meeting at the Cooks River Catchment Management Committee on 22 October 1996.


COOKS RIVER CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

MEETING NO. 39 - TUESDAY 22nd OCTOBER 1996

Report to be included in next Meeting - Councillor John Griffin


1. Agenda of Meeting

2. From the Meeting:

Report: The Presentation by Mr Ron Cullen and Mr Steve Nichols on:
TCM - The State Perspective

Was most informative and designed to assist new Committee Members with the role of Members and the processes that Total Catchment Management Committees can play in Management of natural resources.

Following the discussions, projects and issues were addressed through an identification process and five Working Groups were formed. They are:
Litter, Funding, Education, Sediment and Water Quality. I have been requested to facilitate the Sediment Committee which will address as some of its main issues:

(a) Sediment Collection Traps
(b) Site Controls on Building Sites

Full details of the Working Group will be included in my next report. Current projects will remain Active.

3. Subsequent Action:

I have contacted the Divisional Manager of Health and Building through the General Manager and requested the assistance of our Environmental Planning Officer, Peter Crystal, in addressing what may be the Outcome and Issues surrounding the Sediment Working Group and other contributions that Hurstville City Council can make.

4. Annexe B:

Enclosed are details of the Grants available for a Pilot Community Education Project - six grants of $15,000 each.

5. Annexe C:

Project Update (Current & Recommended).
ANNEXURE B

SOLUTIONS TO POLLUTION - STORMWATER & LOCAL GOVERNMENT PILOT COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROJECTS

SIX GRANTS OF $15,000 EACH

Each person's individual actions to reduce stormwater pollution is critical to achieving higher water quality in our urban waterways.

The New South Wales Government is providing opportunities for six urban councils to undertake projects that focus their communities' attention on improving the quality of stormwater entering their local waterways. As pilots, the projects will also show other councils possible ways forward for community education on stormwater.

This grants program coincides with the release of the State Stormwater Coordinating Committee's draft documents for managing urban stormwater:

Managing urban stormwater: strategic framework
Managing urban stormwater: treatment techniques
Managing urban stormwater: construction activities
(call Pollution Line, 131 555, for copies)

This grants program is a companion to the NSW Government's present environmental management project, Solutions to Pollution: Local Government and Small Business Environment Management project. It also builds on the Solutions to Pollution public education campaign.

GRANTS

Grants of $15,000 each are available to urban councils (see the attached list). Each participating council must match this amount, bringing the total project budget for each project to $30,000.

The Government will give priority to innovative community education projects, at the subcatchment level, which are likely to:

* show how many of our daily actions may eventually degrade stormwater quality;
* encourage more people to become involved in preventing such environmental damage.

ASSESSMENT

A committee of independent and appropriately qualified people will appraise the applications and make recommendations to the Minister for the Environment, the Hon. Pam Allan MP, who will decide upon the grant recipients. In assessing and approving the grants, preference will be given to proposals which:

* are consistent with the draft strategic approach to stormwater (see Managing urban stormwater: strategic framework);
* show high standards in terms of their aims, content and rationale;
* show sound planning, management and administration;
* use appropriately qualified and experienced people;
* maximise meaningful community involvement;
* are likely to have a high community profile;
* are likely to meet their proposed timetable;
* will provide innovative community education case studies.

The production of videos is unlikely to be a high priority for this model program.

APPLICATIONS FORMS

Application forms are available from the Environment Protection Authority (EPA), ph. (02) 9325 5633. The forms are generally consistent with those for the Environmental Education Trust.

PROJECT TIMETABLES

Projects should begin early in 1997. The Government would expect them to run for no longer than twelve months.

ADVICE

If you need further information about on the government's stormwater management approaches, please call Paul Clarke, Senior Project Officer - Stormwater, Environment Protection Authority (EPA) on (02) 9325 5656. If you want advice on current directions in community environmental eduction, or help with developing your proposal, please call Grahame Collier, Manager Education, Education and Community Programs, EPA, on (02) 9325 5855.

CLOSING DATE

The envelope containing your application must be postmarked no later than Monday, 1 December 1996. Send your applications to:

Manager Education
Environment Protection Authority
PO Box 1135
CHATSWOOD NSW 2057

GRANT ANNOUNCEMENT

The Minister for the Environment will announce the grants in December.

SUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS

If your grant application is successful, the EPA will send you a statement of grant conditions, which you must acknowledge by returning a signed acceptance form. These conditions include: agreement to provide matching funds; purpose of the grant; the project timetable; a payment schedule; project variations; revocation and transfer of the grant; reporting requirements; funding acknowledgment; indemnification; and insurance.

You must also provide a final project report, including a certified statement of income and expenditure. Given that this is a model project for other councils to use, this report must be of publication standard.


HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATION NO: .01
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT

. Recommendation COOKS RIVER CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE


RECOMMENDATION


THAT the report be received and noted.

HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
REPORT ITEM NO: .
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT


07.02 DEVELOPMENT CONTROL PLAN - CHILD CARE CENTRES


It is proposed to prepare a Development Control Plan (DCP) to provide appropriate guidelines for the development of Child Care Centres within Hurstville.

Context:

The child care industry has been undergoing significant change in recent years. Many families now require double incomes resulting in marked increases in the demand for long day-care, particularly for children aged 0-2 years. This increasing demand has resulted in growing numbers of child care centres within Sydney.

There is a real need for centres to move away from providing a glorified 'baby sitting' service but rather providing an integrated kindergarten facility which adequately addresses the experiential and developmental growth of children.

Child care facilities form an integral part of the services offered within the Hurstville area. Not only do they provide valuable assistance to single parent families and families requiring two incomes, they also provide social and educational input into the younger children of the area. Child care centres play a significant role in the important formative years of children in the Hurstville area.

Current trends & initiatives:

On 1-September to NSW Department of Community Services released new regulations for centre-based child care services. These amendments represent the culmination of a lengthy review, and while the changes may not be significant numerically, they do represent an increase in spatial requirements for certain areas within child care centres, and a consolidation of the State controls.

Hurstville Council is in receipt of numerous development applications for child care centres and amendments to existing centres, a trend which appears to be continuing as demand continues to increase - particularly for 0-2 year olds.

A buoyant industry has been responding to this growing demand for some time and careful planning is required to ensure that growth takes place in a co-ordinated and sustainable fashion. At present, Hurstville Council does not have any policy in relation to the development of child care centres. This is not considered desirable in the longer-term.

It is important that a DCP be produced which:

* encourages the appropriate development of high-quality centres;

* clearly outlines current controls and industry standards;

* provides uniform controls reflecting current needs and community expectations;

* assist Council officers in assessing development applications; and

* provide prospective operators and owners with a clear indication of procedural requirements and referrals.

It is therefore recommended that preparation of a DCP for child care centres be initiated immediately.


HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATION NO: .02
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT

. Recommendation DEVELOPMENT CONTROL PLAN - CHILD CARE CENTRES


RECOMMENDATION


THAT Council resolve pursuant to Section 72 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 to support the preparation of a draft Development Control Plan for Child Care Centres in accordance with Sections 15 and 16 of the Regulations.

FURTHER, THAT Council give public notice of Council's decision within fourteen days.


HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
REPORT ITEM NO: .
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT


07.03 COUNCILS AND RESIDENTS AGAINST THE SELECTION ON HOLSWORTHY (CRASH)


Hurstville Council is actively involved, along with several other councils and community groups, in ensuring that the Holsworthy site for Sydney's second international airport is discounted as a realistic and viable alternative. Council is represented on the main working party - Councils & Residents Against the Selection of Holsworthy (CRASH), as well as the 'technical' and 'financial' sub-committees.

The working party is co-ordinating a campaign which is already well underway and which will gain momentum into the new year as the EIS is released and further critical decisions are being made.

A summary of the campaign's current initiatives include:

* Preparation of a 10 minute video highlighting the attributes of the Holsworthy site, with copies to be sent to key politicians and political parties;

* Co-ordination with other groups to provide a uniform and consistent voice on the Holsworthy issue. These groups include 9 community groups (represented on the working party), Indigenous people, conservation groups, government bodies and the Labour Council.

* Scheduling of several rallies. A range of local rallies are to be conducted, with one larger public rally being held at 10:00am on the 26-November 1996. A larger regional rally will be scheduled just prior to the release of the EIS in 1997.

* Preparation of promotional material to publicise the rallies and key issues relating to the Holsworthy site.

* Lobbying Federal Government. Councillor Rodden of Sutherland Council will be involved in co-ordinating some discussion with appropriate Ministers and authorities.

* Letters of invitation to attend future CRASH meetings were issued to Hon John Fahey, the Prime Minister, Commonwealth EPA, Minister for Transport, and Department of Transport & Regional Development.

* Representation to Ms Dana Vale, Member for Hughes for members of CRASH to undertake an inspection of the Holsworthy site.

* Submissions being prepared requesting that Councils erect signs within their LGAs opposing the selection of the Holsworthy site.

* The establishment of a central information database at Sutherland Council.

* Freedom of information request. A request has been made for material relating to the selection of Holsworthy and the EIS process under the FOI legislation.

* The formation of a 'clearing house' group (comprising Sutherland Council officers and elected representatives) to discuss administrative functions and efficiently disseminate information.

CRASH meetings are generally scheduled each month, with sub-committee meetings being held prior to these meetings to ensure an appropriate level of information is available for the working party.

HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATION NO: .03
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT

. Recommendation COUNCILS AND RESIDENTS AGAINST THE SELECTION ON HOLSWORTHY (CRASH)


RECOMMENDATION


THAT the information be received and noted.

HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
REPORT ITEM NO: .
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT


07.04 PLANNING STUDIES UPDATE



As Council is aware Policy Planning and Environment are presently undertaking four studies. These are:

(1) The Hurstville Town Centre Study

(2) The Hurstville Town Centre Retail / Commercial Demand Study

(3) The Beverly Hills Town Centre Study }
} Part of Stage 2 of the } Residential Strategies
(4) The Riverwood Town Centre Study

Below is an update on their progress.


HURSTVILLE TOWN CENTRE STUDY

1.0 Background

As Council is aware, a detailed study of the town centre is being undertaken by Urban Design Australia under the direction of Russell Olsson.

2.0 Objectives

The objectives of the Town Centre Study are:

1. To develop a coherent three dimensional holistic design for Hurstville Town Centre which defines the building envelopes and the spatial hierarchy.

2. To optimise the development potential within the town while respecting heritage and environment amenity and the creation of a quality public domain.

3. To address both long and short term strategic planning issues in the town, such as providing a better transport and traffic system to enhance Forest Road and providing better open spaces.

4. To produce the background work for a DCP for Hurstville, which addresses urban form and pedestrian amenity.

5. To provide base information for future development assessment processes.

6. To encourage ownership of Hurstville Town Centre by residents and workers.

3.0 Methodology

All planning controls for the town centre are to be based on an accurate understanding of the town's characteristics. For this reason detailed analysis work has been undertaken.

The initial stage is the analysis work which now is complete and includes base plans, sections, elevations, constraints / opportunities and concept plans. A working model accompanies the drawings. In this model the pieces can be removed and replaced in order to test options for the new building envelopes. As development application solutions are submitted, they can be tested in the model.

The next stage was to develop options for all the sites in conjunction with the provision of open space and appropriate traffic organisation.

Subsequent to the workshop on 26 July 1996 this part of the work has now been divided into two stages.

The first part is the development of building envelopes and definition of the spatial hierarchy. The second part is the provision of open space and traffic organisation.

Building envelopes will be finalised by the end of October. These are based on the existing road pattern and traffic management.

It was considered critical that these were finalised and exhibited as a draft DCP to ensure that all new development proposals conform to the new strategy.

The issues relating to traffic movement and the possible provision of open space (in Barrett Street and The Roundabout) are more complex and involve a range of external authorities. For this reason this work will be undertaken in the new year so as to not hold up the DCP.

Although not part of this original brief I have instructed Urban Design Australia to convert the Urban Design Study directly into a draft DCP.

Consequently, this part of the study will be exhibited in December as a draft DCP. The Steering Committee will meet on 31st October 1996.

4.0 The Workshop

The issues and options for the town centre were identified in a one day workshop held on 26 July 1996.

The objectives of the workshop are:

1. To make stakeholders aware of the background work which has been undertaken and the characteristics of the town.

2. To discuss in focus groups, the issues which have been identified and suggest possible solutions.

3. To obtain a consensus on the direction to follow with the main issues. These include the role of Forest Road, the allocation of open space, parking policy, building form and MacMahon Street.

4.1 Forest Road

Forest Road was the most contentious issue of the workshop and opinions varied widely as to its role and treatment. Consideration as to its role in the town, how it affects the legibility of the town and the traffic movement and parking brought a range of diverse opinions.

The main traffic options considered were:

1. The reinstatement of two way traffic.
2. Maintain the status quo.
3. The removal of all traffic and conversion to a mall.

There was support for a return to two way traffic. However, the implications of this proposal in terms of traffic movement, car parking and width of footpath were not addressed. The wide range of alternatives suggested for car, bus, taxi and pedestrian movement will be investigated in the next stage.

4.2 The Provision of Open Space

Hurstville Town Centre has very little open space and what open space there is poorly defined and designed. Open space is critical to the success of a high density Town Centre. The Town Centre Study proposes three areas to be considered for conversion and / or reinforcement into open space. These areas are:

1. Memorial Square.
2. The Roundabout Triangle.
3. The closure of Barratt Street between Woodville Street and MacMahon Street, including the site of the public toilets.

Open space provision as proposed at the Roundabout and Barratt Street are integrally linked with traffic movement. In general, the workshop participants supported these proposals but the detailed implications still have to be investigated.

There was overwhelming support for upgrading Memorial Square and investigation of different access points into the station to improve its prominence.

4.3 Pedestrian Network

More consensus was evident in the workshop on pedestrian movement than on matters related to cars. Generally, there was support for the outlined objectives:

* Re-establish the legibility of HCBD.

* Strengthening and creating linkages between Forest Road and Westfield, Crofts Avenue, Barratt Street (square), the Supercentre and Ormonde Parade.

* The introduction of a pedestrian walk which continues from Bridge Street along the rail edge on the SRA land into Hurstville (long term).

* The re-design of the bridge connections of Westfield so that they are lighter and more transparent and will enable the street system to be read.

* The creation of a corner at the end of Crofts Avenue as a place with special qualities linking Westfield through to Forest Road and the Station. This would include a re-design of the ramp connection from Crofts Avenue into Westfield. Ideally, the proposed building envelopes will facilitate this re-design which according to Westfields is desirable but has not been possible before.

* Revitalising the lane system parallel to Forest Road by facing development to it and creating clear connections to Forest Road.

4.4 Parking Policy

Parking issues drew a variety of ideas, these included multi-storey car parks, paid car parking and more street car parking.

The policy and principles of on-site car parking is to be undertaken on a site by site basis to suit each building envelope and particular use as part of the DCP. The HCC Manager of Traffic and Transport will address issues such as the desired access points to the site, the amount of car parking, the minimum / maximum proportion on-site and the contributions for off-site car parking. The more general issues will be part of the traffic movement assessment.

4.5 The Integration of Westfield

As with many regional shopping centres, the presence of Westfield in Hurstville has been positive and negative. Undoubtedly it brought economic gains to the city but its planning and architectural resolution is a major contributor to the lack of legibility and vibrancy in the town.

Westfields had both detractions and supporters. It was generally agreed that it contributed little to the "life" of Hurstville and the viability of Forest Road. Integration of Westfields into Hurstville along the lines of some of the North American examples is undoubtedly a long term goal for the centre and strongly supported by the community.

4.6 The Supercentre

Because of its optimal location and role an upgraded supercentre is essential for the town's well being and is unanimously supported by residents.

The study supports an appropriate urban form for the supercentre structure and immediate renewal of the existing building.

4.7 Building Height and Alignment

As Council is aware the primary organising element of any urban area is the spatial system as defined by the buildings. For this reason, building envelopes have been established for each site so that the spatial system, streets / plazas etc can be predetermined as well as the build form.

Despite the fact that building envelopes can give different floor space capacities for each site there seemed general approval of the approach being undertaken.

These envelopes will now form part of the DCP and are due for exhibition in December.

5.0 Programme

Stage 1

Preparation of draft DCP (Building Envelopes) - End October / November
Exhibition of draft DCP (Building Envelopes) - December / January

Stage 2

Traffic / Open Space - January 1997 ongoing

HURSTVILLE TOWN CENTRE RETAIL / COMMERCIAL DEMAND STUDY

1.0 Progress

Hill PDA are undertaking an estimate of commercial and floor space and type retail demands in Hurstville CBD.

For the years 2000, 2010 and 2020 the initial field survey is complete. Consultants will meet now with developers and businessmen in Hurstville before drawing their conclusions.

The study will be complete in November and inform the DCP.

3.0 BEVERLY HILLS AND RIVERWOOD TOWN CENTRE AND RESIDENTIAL STUDY

1.0 Introduction

As Council is aware, Hurstville City Council has to show DUAP how it will achieve increased densities in its area and a range of housing types.

The first areas to be investigated are Beverly Hills and Riverwood. In both cases the area for study includes the town centres and the surrounding areas designated for medium density housing. In both cases the process used will be similar to that used in the Hurstville Town Centre Study ie. a process of analysis, determination of opportunities and constraints and a precinct specific three dimensional design for the structure, combined with architectural resolution guidelines.

2.0 Progress

Both studies are towards the end of the analysis work and both studies have commenced the model.

The analysis work has taken longer than anticipated because of the extent of area to be covered. The analysis includes base plan sections, heritage, existing buildings and existing landscaping.

In both cases, areas additional to the brief have been added to the study at an additional cost of $5,000. This is still within budget.

In the case of Riverwood, the Peakhurst Park area has been included for more detailed evaluation and in the Beverly Hills Study, Beverly Hills North. This will mean that the bulk of Hurstville medium density and "threatened" areas will be addressed in these two studies.

Consultations with residents is next step and will be undertaken in November when a suitable date can be arranged. It is envisaged that these workshops will be held in the evening to ensure maximum attendance.

3.0 Programme

Completion of Analysis - End of October.
Community Consultation Developing Options - November
Completion of Study - End of December
Preparation of DCP - February
Exhibition of draft DCP - March


6.0 Conclusion

All four planning studies are well underway. The draft DCP for Hurstville Town Centre will be exhibited in December 1997. The Commercial / Retail Study will be complete prior to the draft DCP and inform the DCP. Beverly Hills and Riverwood will begin community consultation in November.









HURSTVILLE CITY COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATION NO: .04
POLICY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT

. Recommendation PLANNING STUDIES UPDATE


RECOMMENDATION


THAT the report be received and noted.

Yours faithfully,





J. McCREDIE
Divisional Manager
Policy, Planning and Environment